Nestlé Wants to Suck Even More Water Out of Michigan


Source:  EcoWatch/Sami Mericle

Given that Michigan, the “Great Lakes State,” is practically surrounded by water, the state sure has trouble managing its water.

Five state officials were recently charged with involuntary manslaughter for their roles in a public health crisis that has left the city of Flint without drinkable tap water for years following widespread lead poisoning and an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. In another highly publicized case, during the last several years thousands of Detroit residents found their water disconnected for nonpayment in what United Nations experts deemed a violation of human rights.

The battle over fresh water has now reached Osceola Township, a town of barely 1,000 residents, where Nestlé Waters North America wants to increase its pumping of spring water from the White Pines Spring. Currently, Nestlé pumps about 250 gallons per minute from the spring; the company hopes to increase that to 400 gallons per minute—a total of 210 million gallons per year. Nestlé pays nothing for the water, which it sells in the Midwest under its Ice Mountain label.

“We live in the Great Lakes state,” said David Holtz, chair of the Michigan Sierra Club. “And yet we have a community like Flint [where] residents don’t have access to clean, affordable, safe drinking water. And at the same time, we’re giving water away to Nestlé to sell for profit.”

Nestlé’s application to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) has been met with public opposition since MLive broke the story last October. The proposed increase comes in conjunction with a $36 million expansion to Nestlé’s Ice Mountain bottling plant in nearby Stanwood.

Reports commissioned by Nestlé predict no significant adverse effects on streamflow, local wetlands or aquatic habitats as a result of the increased pumping. But environmental groups contest that conclusion. They argue that neither Nestlé nor the MDEQ has considered the aggregate impacts of the company’s activities at a total of seven wells in Osceola County and neighboring Mecosta County.

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